List name
Museums Field Guide apps species profiles – vertebrates
Owner
ewallis@museum.vic.gov.au
List type
Species characters list
Description
Species profiles that feature in a suite of eight Field Guide apps, one for every State and Territory in Australia, made by a collaboration of museums. The apps are available for Apple and Android devices and are free to download. The project was undertaken during 2012-2014 and was funded by the Federal Government through an Inspiring Australia, Unlocking Australia’s Potential grant. Partners in the project were Museum Victoria, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Australian Museum, Queensland Museum Network, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Western Australian Museum, and the South Australian Museum.
URL
http://museumvictoria.com.au/national-apps
Date submitted
2014-06-23
Date updated
2016-06-14
Is private
No
Included in species pages
Yes
Authoritative
Yes
Invasive
No
Threatened
No
Part of the sensitive data service
No
Region
Not provided
Metadata link
https://collections.ala.org.au/public/show/dr1146

1060 Number of Taxa

1053 Distinct Species

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Pseudocaranx georgianus
Pseudocaranx georgianus (Cuvier, 1833)
Silver Trevally
 
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Delphinus delphis
Delphinus delphis Linnaeus, 1758
Common Dolphin
 
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Eubalaena australis
Eubalaena australis (Desmoulins, 1822)
Southern Right Whale
 
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Tursiops truncatus
Tursiops truncatus (Montagu, 1821)
Bottlenose Dolphin
 
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Hirundo (Hirundo) neoxena
Hirundo (Hirundo) neoxena Gould, 1843
Welcome Swallow
 
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Pomatomus saltatrix
Pomatomus saltatrix (Linnaeus, 1766)
Tailor
 
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Megaptera novaeangliae
Megaptera novaeangliae (Borowski, 1781)
Humpback Whale
 
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Ailuroedus crassirostris
Ailuroedus crassirostris (Paykull, 1815)
Green Catbird
 
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Alectura lathami
Alectura lathami J.E. Gray, 1831
Australian Brush-Turkey
 
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Anthus (Anthus) novaeseelandiae
Anthus (Anthus) novaeseelandiae (Gmelin, 1789)
Australian Pipit
 
Action Supplied Name Scientific Name (matched) Image Author (matched) Common Name (matched) Brief description Description Biology Habitat Native status Maximum size (cm) Diet Link to video Dangerous Colours Distribution Habitat types Depth Water column Commercial species Calling Months Where seen When seen Author credit
Pseudocaranx georgianus Pseudocaranx georgianus (Cuvier, 1833) Silver Trevally
Body oval, compressed, tail strongly forked, scutes rear of midline, pectoral fins scythe-like; greenish-blue above, silvery below, black spot on gill cover.
Body deep, oval, compressed, tail base very slender, caudal fin strongly forked; pectoral fins long, slender, scythe-like; scutes at rear end of lateral line. Greenish-blue above, silvery below, with a rather large diffuse black spot on upper margin of gill cover; juveniles and subadults often banded with yellow mid-lateral stripe and faint yellow stripe along dorsal and anal-fin bases. Up to 94 cm.
Large mobile schools of Silver Trevally move in and out of estuaries, and often hang around jetties and piers.
Coastal waters and bays, often near rocky areas, in depths of 0-30 m.
Recorded in Australia
New Zealand and southern Australia.
Marine
Shallow (1-30m)
Midwater
False
Dianne J. Bray, Dr Martin F. Gomon / Museum Victoria
Delphinus delphis Delphinus delphis Linnaeus, 1758 Common Dolphin
Dark upper body, pale yellow sides, black stripe along beak, black patch around eye.
Upper body dark grey from beak to midway between the dorsal fin and tail flukes. Sides of body pale yellow and sides of tail grey-white. Dark stripe from beak and dark patch around each eye. Up to 2.5 m long.
Common Dolphins swim in groups (pods), sometimes with hundreds or thousands of individuals. Their food includes shoaling and mid-water fish and squid. They are at risk from entanglement in nets.
Open water and shallow coastal seas.
Recorded in Australia
Carnivore
Worldwide. Most Australian waters.
Marine
Shallow (1-30m),Deep (>30m)
Surface,Midwater
False
Dr Erich Fitzgerald, Dr Ryan Jefferies, Dr Kevin C Rowe / Museum Victoria
Eubalaena australis Eubalaena australis (Desmoulins, 1822) Southern Right Whale
Blue-black, white patches underneath, white growths on head, 'V' shape blow.
Body blue-black with white patches underneath. Head wide, with white callosities (calluses) above and below the mouth and near the eyes and on top of head. Mouth curves down. Water vapour is sprayed from the blowhole forming a 'V' shape spray less than 5 m high. Up to 18 m long.
Southern Right Whales can dive underwater for about 15 minutes. They do not feed in Australian waters. The females give birth to a young calf every three years, which swims at the mother's side for up to twelve months. Deaths have been reported from being tangled in fishing nets and from collisions with ships. They feed on plankton, krill and copepods (small crustaceans).
Temperate and polar oceans, near coastlines.
Recorded in Australia
Plankton or Particles
Southern temperate to subpolar waters including marine areas of southern Australia from May to October.
Marine
Shallow (1-30m),Deep (>30m)
Surface,Midwater
False
Dr Erich Fitzgerald, Dr Ryan Jefferies, Dr Kevin C Rowe / Museum Victoria
Tursiops truncatus Tursiops truncatus (Montagu, 1821) Bottlenose Dolphin
Upper body dark to light grey, fading to white underneath.
Upper body dark to light grey, fading to white underneath. Head and tail stock paler than body when viewed from above. Beak short and wide with 21-29 pairs of teeth in each jaw. Mouth curves upwards. Up to 3.8 m long.
Bottlenose Dolphins live in groups of up to several hundred. They eat a range of food, mostly fish and squid. They are usually found in offshore locations. They are common in captivity, where they are often trained to perform for humans.
Open water, bays and occasionally tidal areas of rivers.
Recorded in Australia
Carnivore
Worldwide. Most Australian waters.
Marine
Shallow (1-30m),Deep (>30m)
Surface,Midwater
False
Dr Erich Fitzgerald, Dr Ryan Jefferies, Dr Kevin C Rowe / Museum Victoria
Hirundo (Hirundo) neoxena Hirundo (Hirundo) neoxena Gould, 1843 Welcome Swallow
A small blue-black bird with a grey-white belly, red-brown face and forked tail.
Upper body parts shiny blue-black and underparts grey-white. Forehead and throat red-brown. Tail forked. Body up to 15 cm long.
Numbers of Welcome Swallows vary seasonally, with large flocks common in coastal areas. They feed on insects, which they catch in flight.
Most areas.
Native to Australia
Insects
Mainland Australia and Tasmania.
Terrestrial
Shore (0-1m)
Above surface
False
Museum Victoria Sciences Staff / Museum Victoria
Pomatomus saltatrix Pomatomus saltatrix (Linnaeus, 1766) Tailor
Body robust, moderately long, compressed, two dorsal fins, the first with short spines; bluish-green to steely-grey above, silvery-white below.
Body robust, streamlined, covered in small scales; two separate dorsal fins, the first with short spines, tail large, forked; jaws large reaching beyond the eye with a single row of prominent knife-like teeth. Greenish-blue to steel-grey above, fading to silver below, with a small dark blotch at pectoral-fin base, iris yellow. Up to 1.2 m, usually 40 cm long head to tail tip.
Tailor are fast-swimming voracious predators and feed on small schooling fishes such as anchovies, herring and mullet. This wide-ranging species spawns in the open sea and is seasonally migratory, occurring in southern Australian waters during summer months. It is highly prized by recreational anglers and is excellent eating. The name 'Tailor' comes from the habit of cutting fishing nets with its scissor-like teeth.
Primarily pelagic in the open ocean, coming inshore close to beaches and into bays in search of food, in depths of 1-15 m.
Recorded in Australia
Carnivore
Widespread in subtropical and temperate coastal waters, seasonally present in southern Australian waters.
Marine
Shallow (1-30m)
Midwater
True
Dianne J. Bray, Dr Martin F. Gomon / Museum Victoria
Megaptera novaeangliae Megaptera novaeangliae (Borowski, 1781) Humpback Whale
Grey-black body with white underside, small curved dorsal fin, tail white underneath, white patches on flippers, bushy jet as water vapour spray.
Body grey-black above with extensive white on lower part of the body, occasionally extending to dorsal surface. Small dorsal fin with curved edge. Flippers on side of body have white underneath and lumps on the front edge. Tail dark on top; white underneath. Water vapour spray from blowhole is a single bushy jet less than 5 m high. Adults can grow up to 16 m long.
Humpback Whales migrate to warmer Australian waters in Hervey Bay and the Great Barrier Reef to breed in winter months. They feed on plankton.
Open oceans and near coastlines.
Recorded in Australia
Plankton or Particles
Worldwide. A winter migrant in marine areas of Australia.
Marine
Shallow (1-30m),Deep (>30m)
Surface,Midwater
False
Dr Erich Fitzgerald, Dr Ryan Jefferies, Dr Kevin C Rowe / Museum Victoria
Ailuroedus crassirostris Ailuroedus crassirostris (Paykull, 1815) Green Catbird
Large, stout, green body with white spots, red eyes.
Large, stout, green bird, spotted white, with a dusky crown, nape and face and a white bill. The eye is red. Juveniles are duller in colour. Body length up to 33 cm.
Although they belong to the bowerbird family, the males of this species do not build bowers and only mate with one female, helping her to defend and feed their offspring. They usually feed in pairs or small groups, moving from tree to tree in the mid to upper canopy. Their diet consists of fruit, notably figs, flowers, and other plant material; they have also been known to kill baby birds to feed young during the breeding season and will eat small reptiles too. They have a cat-like mewing call; sometimes likened to the cry of a human baby.
Temperate and sub-tropical rainforest and paperbarks, and sometimes adjacent eucalypt forest.
33
Omnivore
Green, Brown
Eastern Australia
Terrestrial
False
Louise Carter / Australian Museum
Alectura lathami Alectura lathami J.E. Gray, 1831 Australian Brush-Turkey
Large bird, black body plumage with a red head.
A large bird with mainly black body plumage, bare red head, yellow throat wattle (pale blue in northern birds), a laterally-flattened tail and large feet. Size up to 75 cm.
It feeds on insects, seeds and fallen fruits, which are exposed by raking the leaf litter or breaking open rotten logs with its large feet. The male usually builds a large mound of organic matter, approximately 4 m in diameter and 1 m high. Eggs are laid by several females in a single mound and are incubated by the heat given off by the rotting vegetation. The male maintains a constant temperature of 33-38°C by digging holes in the mound and inserting his bill to check the heat, then adding or removing vegetable matter as required. After hatching, the chicks burrow out of the mound. The hatchlings are fully feathered and are able to walk and fend for themselves immediately. Remarkably, they are able to fly just a few hours after hatching.
Rainforest and wet sclerophyll forests, but can also be found in drier scrubs.
75
Omnivore
Black, Red, Yellow
Eastern Australia
Terrestrial
False
Louise Carter / Australian Museum
Anthus (Anthus) novaeseelandiae Anthus (Anthus) novaeseelandiae (Gmelin, 1789) Australian Pipit
Well-camouflaged, brown, ground-dweller with pale pink/grey bill and feet.
Well-camouflaged, brown ground-dwelling bird, with darker brown streaks above and pale creamy white stripes on the eyebrows and below the cheeks. Underparts are creamy white, spotted and streaked dark on the breast. Wings and tail are dark brown, with the outermost tail feathers white. Bill and feet are pale pink-grey. Body length up to 18 cm.
Diet consists of insects and their larvae, as well as seeds. It forages in a jerky, darting motion, stopping to perch on low stones or shrubs, wagging its tail up and down. Breeding pairs are formed after an elaborate courtship ritual, with males making swooping dives from a height, accompanied by a sweet trilling song. The nest is a depression in the ground, sometimes sheltered by a grass tussock, stone or piece of wood, and lined with grasses and hairs. The female incubates the eggs and feeds the young.
Open country, in a range of habitat types from saltmarshes to dry shrublands and open woodland clearings.
18
Insectivore
Brown
Across Australia
Terrestrial
False
Louise Carter / Australian Museum
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